Christopher Jeffery

Fixed Income Strategist

Chris is a strategist with a focus on fixed income and systematic dynamic strategies. He joined the team from a similar role at BNP Paribas, having started his career at the Bank of England. When not strategising about bonds, he has an enthusiasm for running, golf and (inexplicably) gardening. A lot of market strategists like to talk rhubarb, Chris prefers to grow it.

Posts by Christopher Jeffery

Strategy

Off the record, on the QT, and very hush-hush

Quantitative easing is a bit of a puzzle. It doesn't work in theory, but appears to have worked well in practice. Should we be worried as that process now edges into reverse with the advent of 'quantitative tightening'?

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Strategy

All roads lead to Rome

With the country saddled with high debt and unstable politics, Italian debt markets have persistently underperformed European averages for the last couple of years. This pessimistic narrative is definitely seductive but we believe it is dangerous to get sucked into an excessively negative outlook. The debt problems are chronic rather than acute, the politics are not obviously more unstable than usual, the ECB is being flexible with asset purchases, and the return potential could be greater than it first appears.

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Macrobites

A filibusted flush

The filibuster is an important procedural device in the US Senate that makes it significantly harder to break the gridlock between Republicans and Democrats. President Trump argues that the "very outdated filibuster must go". But what is it? Why is it important? And what are the investment implications of throwing it on the Congressional scrapheap?

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Strategy

The blessing and curse of low interest rates

Low interest rates can be considered both a blessing and a curse. The blessing is that the government yield curve impacts discount rates used across almost all financial assets.  The curse is that they incentivise changes in economic structures (e.g. higher debt) which, in turn, make low interest rates more entrenched. The blessing and curse of low interest rates is therefore that they are (probably) here to stay.

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